COVID-19: Helping the Environment, Hurting its People

NASA+Satellite+image+showing+a+comparison+of+pollution+rates+between+two+months+in+the+South-West+region+of+the+United+States.+Image+courtesy+of+%27Space.com%27+

NASA Satellite image showing a comparison of pollution rates between two months in the South-West region of the United States. Image courtesy of 'Space.com'

Vivian Capraro, Staff Writer

  Since the start of the COVID-19 outbreak, a lower number of people have been out and about. Staying indoors has had a major impact on the environment , but this happens to be for the better.

 

     Now that the nation is on lockdown, international travel has been almost eliminated. The amount of air pollution has decreased by a landslide. Recently, people in India have been able to view the peaks of the Himalayas. This was unlikely before, due to the copious amounts of fog surrounding them. This dramatic change in air pollution also extends to the underuse of cars. Now that many people are working from home, they do not have a daily commute. Furthermore, gasoline is not a weekly expense for most people any longer. 

 

     In addition ,water pollution has reduced significantly as well. This is especially the case in Venice, Italy. Due to the fact that boats are no longer used for entertainment by the public, there has been a reduction in pollution. In Thailand, water is clearer than ever before. Even if this was unintentional, COVID-19 has greatly impacted the environment. 

 

    It is important to look for the positive within the negative. It is unquestionably tragic that the world is in a state of suffering at the moment. However, the environment is benefiting. While it may not seem like a huge feat , the current, positive environmental conditions should be known. 

 

     “The environment benefiting from the pandemic shows us that there is always a bright side”, says a ninth grade student  at Somerset Academy Canyons.